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October 17th - 23th Downloads
& DVDs
 
  • Spider-Man: Homecoming:

    It is difficult to keep all the iterations of the Spider-Man franchise straight because the title actors and the name of the game keeps changing, so it’s good to go back to near the beginning here, with Peter Parker (Tom Holland), endowed with his Spidy-senses, is a regular high school student with dreams of becoming an Avenger.  In last year’s “Captain America: Civil War,” Peter as Spider-Man helped The Avengers by assisting in ending the carnage in the streets of New York.  He came to the attention of Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.) who, in this movie, is his mentor in an offhand sort of way.  As Spider-Man, Peter has been doing the friendly-neighbourhood thing, dealing with petty criminals and small-time hoods, but what he really wants is to get back to the big-time.  When a new villain, The Vulture (Michael Keaton) comes on the scene, Peter takes a chance.  There are some surprises from The Vulture, though, and soon Peter, aka Spider-Man, is in well over his head.  Zendaya plays Peter’s girlfriend Michelle, and Marisa Tomei is his Aunt May.  Rated 14A.

     

  • Girls Trip:

    This raunchy, R-rated comedy follows the fortunes and misfortunes of four friends for life who have drifted away from one another over the years, but decide to reunite by taking a trip to New Orleans for the dancing, the drinking, the brawling, and all the rest of what goes on The Big Easy. A strong cast that includes Jada Pinkett-Smith, Queen Latifah, Regina Hall, and Tiffany Haddish, is paired with a very edgy script that attracted the R- rating that sees the girls get themselves into a world of trouble, but in a good way.  This is the first movie produced, written, directed, and starring an all-African-American cast to pass the $100 million mark, DVD and on-demand numbers are yet to come, so you can expect to see more just like this.  Not my cup of Starbucks, but you can’t deny those box office results. Rated 18A.

  • Landline:

    Another R-rated comedy, but this one suffered dramatically at the box office.  It had a reported budget of $5 million, and it took in less than $1 million in ticket receipts.  Everything that Girls Trip did right, from a business perspective, this one did wrong.  It’s set in 1995, and makes a big point of recognizing that almost no one had a cell phone, that people who smoked still did so in their houses, offices, and in stores, and that family ties, while they may strain, remain intact, sort of.  Alan and Pat (John Turturro and Edie Falco) are a married couple with teenage daughters.  When one of them discovers that her father is having an affair, and shares the news with her sister, things become unhinged.  Set in a New York City that is pre-9/11 and definitely a different place than the one that exists today, there are a number of set-pieces strung together here that just don’t work, largely, I think, because of the inexperience of writer-director Elizabeth Robespierre, who seems to be waxing nostalgic about her own life.  Not a good movie at any level.  Rated 18A.


  • Disney's Beauty and the Beast (2017):

    A live-action recreation of the animated version of the Disney tale from 1991, we have Harry Potter alum Emma Watson as Belle, the beautiful young woman confined to the castle of The Beast (Dan Stevens).   He was a handsome prince, back in the day, but had an evil spell cast upon him, forcing him to occupy the beastly body forever, or until someone truly loved him, despite his looks.  The hook is that the falling-in-love must be done before the final petal falls of an enchanted rose ... and that time is coming soon.  Emma Thomson is great as Mrs. Potts, the Angela Lansbury character from the animated version, Ewan McGregor is Lumiere, and Luke Evans is Gaston.  An excellent re-telling of a classic fairy tale. Rated PG.


     

     

    Monster Trucks (2016):

    A fantasy-adventure with comic overtones rolls out the story of of Tripp (Lucas Till), a high school student in a small town.  He would love to move on, to be able to go to the big city, get an education, and leave everything behind, but he has neither the means nor the opportunity.  The town's major claim to fame is that it is adjacent to a number of oilfields and in the course of exploring for the black gold, something is unleashed.  Tripp is the one discover a strange entity that feeds on oil, and it soon takes up residence in an old truck that Tripp is trying to restore.  Interesting concept, and fine for kids up to about age 15 ... much beyond that, and they'll see it as "lame!"  Rated PG. 

     

Blade Runner (1982):

With the remake of this science fiction classic arriving in theatres next month, this is a very good time to get reacquainted with the source material.  Harrison Ford is Rick Deckard in a future Los Angeles where he is an ex-cop, and now works as a "blade runner," people contracted to destroy "replicants" which are androids who look human.  When a group of four commit violent crimes in an off-world colony, he is called in to find them and to eliminate them.  Rutger Hauer co-stars, as does Sean Young.  Based on the novel by Philip K. Dick, director Ridley Scott still sees this as the most complete film he has ever made.

New on AMAZON PRIME

American Gangster (2007):
Denzel Washington is the bad guy here, an organized crime kingpin named Frank Lucas who ruled the drug trade in the eastern US during the 1970s.  Based on actual events and real people, we see the inhumanity that Lucas dishes out in order to keep his empire intact, and we see the lengths to which Richie Roberts (Russell Crowe), a NYPD operative will go to stop Lucas.  At the heart of the story is the ingenious method that Lucas devised to get top-quality heroin into the country, and the ingenious police work needed to stop the inflow.  Josh Brolin and Idris Elba also star.  Good, solid, gritty crime story.  Rated 18A. 


 
With the remake of this science fiction classic arriving in theatres next month, this is a very good time to get reacquainted with the source material.  Harrison Ford is Rick Deckard in a future Los Angeles where he is an ex-cop, and now works as a "blade runner," people contracted to destroy "replicants" which are androids who look human.  When a group of four commit violent crimes in an off-world colony, he is called in to find them and to eliminate them.  Rutger Hauer co-stars, as does Sean Young.  Based on the novel by Philip K. Dick, director Ridley Scott still sees this as the most complete film he has ever made.